Book Review 2 – Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

by Eleanor Coerr

Today, I will be doing a second book review. This time, it will be discussing the short story, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr.

This is a true story about a 10-year-old Japanese girl, Sadako Sasaki, who was diagnosed with luekemia as a result of an atom bomb that the U.S. dropped on a town called Hiroshima in an attempt to end a World War. After discovering her sickness, Sadako is determined to make 1000 paper cranes, which, in Japanese tradition, will heal her so that she can be on the running team, as she has always wanted.

I will admit, the story was very bittersweet. I really love Sadako’s courage and determination, as well as her effort to remain optomistic during such a tough time.

Her family and friends are very supportive of Sadako, her best friend, Mitsue, being the one who told her about the paper cranes, a good luck charm, even though she didn’t believe in them, herself. In the story, Sadako never made all 1000 cranes, but her friends from school came through, in the end.

Sadako even has her own monument to honor all those who died from luekemia as a result of the atom bomb.

Overall, I think that this story is very short-and-sweet. I enjoyed how the book can teach you a little more about Japanese culture, including learning how to create paper cranes (a community service project that I am participating in for book club.)

These were the first paper cranes, and pieces of origami, that I’ve ever made. I think that I did a pretty good job!

Me, other club members, and my school plans to send the cranes to homeless or less-fortunate children to let them know that we care! I haven’t participated in many community service projects, but I’m glad that we’re using our knowledge and hobbies to help those in need.

I hope you all enjoyed this book review! Every 1 to 3 months, I will likely be making a new one, so be on the lookout!

Have a beautiful day everyone! ✨

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