7 Things that I’ve Learned Since I’ve Bought My (Third) Betta Fish

It’s been a little while since we’ve gotten Peace (about a week or so.) And I must admit that the time has went by so fast! Since I’m able to stay downstairs, where Peace is located, while I do my schoolwork, we have already been able to create a bond. Getting to know him and the different parts of his big (but sweet) personality makes my heart content.

Despite the short time that I’ve had him, I’ve learned a lot about the evolution of betta fish and the type of care that they need to keep them happy. Here are 7 of the lessons that I’ve learned since getting my third betta fish. This post is for current betta fish keepers, potential future betta fish owners, and even those who are just curious to see the care that these small but beautiful fish need.

1. A heater is a must.

Since bettas are tropical fish, it is required to get a heater that will keep your aquarium water evenly distributed with heat. In the wild, bettas are found in places with a temperature between 75-82 degrees. Therefore, when you get a pet betta, it is crucial that you keep the temperature (from minimum to maximum) 75-85 degrees to keep them comfortable in their environment.

2. Healthy bettas are very interactive.

When most people think of teaching a pet tricks, they will likely think of, let’s face it, a dog. While you might not be able to touch your betta as you would a mammal companion, you can still teach them tricks and play with them. Bettas are highly intelligent, therefore, similarly to a goldfish, you can teach them how to swim through hoops, jump to fetch their food from your fingers, and push a ball–either moss or ping-pong–across the top of the tank. When you put the time and love in, bettas can be super interactive, sweet, and loving pets!

3. There is a such thing as overfeeding.

Some bettas have stomachs that are smaller than their eyes, which, if you aren’t aware, are super tiny. This means that while you can feed them anywhere between twice a day to once every other day, you must do so with caution, as bettas can be overfed. This is why some betta owners let their fish fast once a week.

Still, keep in mind that you shouldn’t leave your betta at home or not feed your fish for more than 3 days, and if you ever do this, don’t do so often. While we as fish owners should avoid overfeeding, healthy and happy fish still need to be fed at least 6 days a week.

4. Many fish eat insects.

Bettas are actually known to eat insects, larvae and even other smaller fish, in their natural habitats. While most people tend to feed their betta pellets made from insects, it is a good idea to feed your betta live food such as blood worms or brine shrimp a couple times a week. Keep in mind that this is not required, but rather a couple alternatives if your betta doesn’t like pellets or flakes and/or you want to add a little more variety into his or her diet.

5. Aquarium plants (whether real or synthetic) serve for great places to sleep.

Personally, I see my betta sleeping next to or on top of the plastic plants in his tank quite often. To be honest, it’s probably one of the spots in his 3 gallon aquarium that he loves the most and spends the most time in. Many bettas sleep at night and periodically during the day, so don’t be surprised if you see your betta snoozing on some of the tank plants.

Bettas can sleep in many different ways–some of which may look uncomfortable or strange–but this is a completely a normal behavior. So don’t panic if you see your betta being still or motionless for some periods of time. They’re likely just taking a nap. Just like we need our sleep, healthy bettas take naps and need their rest to remain happy and healthy. As long as you see their little gills moving at a steady pace, their is nothing to worry about.

6. Bettas get to know you through feeding times and frequent interaction.

Here’s me interacting with my fish baby, Peace. He loves to check out my fingers when I gently place my hand on his tank.

Believe it or not, bettas can grow to love their owners, and healthy betta fish should commonly swim up to the tank to see you and interact with you when you pass by. Most fish associate their owners with playtime, feeding time, as well as simple companionship and a source of love. Therefore, make sure that you give your betta attention throughout the day, give them plenty of things in their tank to interact with (without over-doing it or adding decor with ragged edges), and you will likely feel the connection between you and your fish grow.

7. Bettas can beg (even when they’re not hungry).

Okay, so Peace is a really awesome fish (if you can’t already tell) but he, as well as many other fish, are probably more similar to dogs than you might think. How, exactly? Well…they beg. You see, my betta will commonly stay at the top of the tank just before or after feeding time, which is two times daily. Considering that we feed him quite a decent amount, it is obviously that he isn’t hungry, but instead he just loves to eat.

So, if you see your betta begging, don’t get sucked in by their adorableness. In the wild, bettas will eat as much as they can, as they aren’t sure when their next meal will be. Similarly, healthy domesticated bettas will eat as much as you feed them, and may even ask for more, whether they are hungry or not. I know. It’s pretty crazy and hilarious at the same time.


I hope that these fun facts were very interesting and informative for you all. It was super fun to talk about bettas, which are honestly better pets then they might seem.

Question of the Day: Do you have any pet(s)? Is there anything that you’ve learned after you got your pet(s)? Also, which fact in this post surprised you, if any? Please comment down below.

Have a beautiful and blessed day, everyone! Peace in! ✨

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